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A walk along the coast

02/05/2022
Majorca coast

The walk (or run for those who are feeling energetic) starts from one of our hotels located in Cala d'Or, Mallorca. Walk towards Cala sa Nau until you reach the cycle path (if you’re coming from Sa Marina join the cycle path at the roundabout at the entrance to Cala d'Or next to the Cespa petrol station). From the other hotels head along Calle de s'Espalmador and, keeping to this street, continue until you reach the start of the cycle path that takes you to the Cala Sa Nau/Cala Mitjana path.

After approximately 1km turn right along an unpaved track towards Cala Mitjana (cars are not allowed along here). This track leads right to the cove. Once there, have a short rest and take in the extraordinary beauty of the landscape. In summer a ‘capfico’ (a dip in the sea) is a must, although you can also take one in winter. Sea lovers and swimming enthusiasts will not be able to resist the turquoise waters and will want to plunge straight in. If you have never tried cold water swimming, we would encourage you to give it a go. It’s a very special experience.

 

Woman swimming in the sea

 

Did you know that swimming makes up happy? The relaxing sensation of the water against our bodies reduces stress and releases powerful endorphins that improve our wellbeing. So, leave your worries behind and take a dip in one of the world’s clearest seas.

 

After your rest continue along the route towards Es Puntàs and Es Cossi, two stunning sites along this coastal terrain. Take a cobbled path that runs parallel to the left of the cove (avoid the paved road as it’s private and you might get told off).

The next section takes you over the rocks (it can be a bit uncomfortable so we recommend wearing trainers with a thick sole or walking boots) heading east until you see the impressive hole of Es Puntàs crag. This is a very popular spot with rock climbers. The coast between Cala Serena and Cala Sa Nau is a top spot for those who do psicobloc, also known as deep-water soloing, and in spring and summer you’ll see people doing it. Young people who are fans of this extreme sport come from as far away as the United States and Australia to do this type of free climbing. It is very dangerous and has resulted in a number of deaths. The pioneer and person responsible for naming the sport was the Mallorcan Miquel Riera. He made this type of climbing fashionable among his acquaintances from all over the world. The Mallorcan pop group Antònia Font dedicated a song to him.  

 

Woman practicing psicoblock

 

The island has excellent climbing training centres if you want to give it a go or improve your technique so you can climb in uniquely beautiful natural settings. We recommend you do not climb alone, always let someone know where you are going to climb and take all safety measures.

Mallorca is a paradise for adventure sports such as scuba diving, kayaking, caving, snorkelling and climbing.

 

 

Geology

This coastline is formed of karst platforms that originated under the sea during the Tertiary Period, some 10 million years ago. Along the low stepped cliffs, sea erosion has created areas of smooth rock covered by sea water.

The area closest to Cala Sa Nau has an almost lunar landscape, with large formations of marés sandstone (ancient mangrove swamps) containing fossils of shells and other living creatures trapped in time.  

 

Mallorca beach

 

Flora

Although the coast is hit by heavy storms from the east during the winter months and conditions for plants are tough due to the salinity of the environment, you can see true survivors such as saltpetre, sea fennel,  juniper trees (one of the native trees that is most resistant to the salt thrown at them by the easterly storms) and a few small pine trees that are reminiscent of Japanese bonsais because the wind and salty water stunt their growth, sculpting them into unusual forms.

 

Typical plant of the mallorca coast

 

Fauna

If you are a nature lover, we recommend taking binoculars on the walk. Look out for the flight of the cormorant (Phalacrocoracide) coming and going from its home in the cracks in the rocks, the colourful bee-eater (Merops apiaster), the majestic Eleonora’s falcon (Falco eleonorae) and listen out for the song of the blue rock thrush (Monticola solitarius).

The walk takes you through cultivated fields and pine groves where you might see red-legged partridges (Alectoris rufa), Eurasian hoopoes (Upupa epopos), European goldfinches (Carduelis carduelis), red kites (Milvus milvus) and great tits (Parus major). Some migratory species can only be seen in certain months.

If you’re lucky you might even get to see dolphins when the sea is calm (the best time is the early morning or evening).

 

Typical animal of the Mallorca coast

 

Toponomy

Some points of interest are Es Cossi, Es Puntàs, Sa Cova de Cala sa Nau and Forat d’en Mengo. The latter is only visible from the sea and is highly recommended as a kayaking trip. For more information check out our adventure sports partner: marimonte-online.com

 

Head towards Cala sa Nau leaving Es Puntàs on the right with its majestic window out on to the sea. Soon you’ll see Cala sa Nau in the background. Walk near the sea over the rocks. We recommend following the red trail left on the rocks by walkers (if you stray from this path the rocks become very sharp and walking is very uncomfortable).  

A surprise awaits you on the walk that will take you right back to prehistoric times on our island. You can see the funerary hypogea or burial caves at Cala Sa Nau. Archaeologists cannot agree on their date, but it would appear that they are from the Pretalayotic period (between the 3rd millennium BC and the end of the 2nd millennium BC). The Pretalayotic period is the name given to the first cultural manifestation of prehistoric society on the Gymnesian Islands (as Mallorcan and Menorca were known before the Roman conquest). You’ll find the burial chambers on your left right at the end of the path.

Then have a final dip in the waters of the cove or sunbathe on the warm sand and enjoy a few moments of relaxation. We recommend avoiding the hottest months of the year and the middle of the day. The route is ideal for walking between October and May and is best done in the morning.

 

The return route is straightforward along a paved track towards Cala Ferrera-Cala d'Or and then retrace your steps along the route you have just taken to return.  

 

We hope you enjoy your walk. Remember to leave nature as you find it and take any rubbish home with you in your rucksack.

Musical recommendation to accompany the walk: Antònia Font ‘Un Minut Estroboscòpica’.

 

 

Blog

Discover Mallorca’s prehistory at Closos de Can Gaià
19/08/2022
Discover Mallorca’s prehistory at Closos de Can Gaià
“Closos de Can Gaià” is an outstanding example of a Mallorcan prehistoric archaeological site. It is a short distance from Portocolom, an old fishing port that has kept its traditional seafaring charm, and it is close to coves and natural spaces where you can enjoy the Mediterranean and just a few kilometres from Cala d’Or and your inturotel hotel.   A Mallorcan prehistoric archaeological site Here you can find a small village that was inhabited between 2000 and 700 bc, where five prehistoric naveta (little ship) houses are currently preserved from an original total of at least 10. These houses take their name from their distinctive shape, which resembles the keel of an upside-down boat. But what were navetas? What were they used for? Navetas, or naviforms, were the houses of the communities that inhabited the Balearic Islands during the Bronze Age. They were made of dry stone, without any type of mortar or cement, and had a roof made of wood, branches and compacted clay and an elongated horseshoe floor plan.     Who lived in these houses? This might be one of the hardest questions to answer, as these homes were built thousands of years ago and were inhabited for over seven centuries in some cases. We now believe that each of them was home to what we call a “domestic or residential group”: in other words. people who shared a common space where they did their everyday activities (sleeping, eating, working, etc.) and who were not necessarily a family in the contemporary sense of a group of relations.   What was life like in a village 3,000 years ago? Obviously, it was different to now, but this did not necessarily mean it was worse. We have to do a process of archaeological imagination, based on the large amount of scientific data obtained over almost 100 years of archaeological research. We are in a Mallorca that had a much smaller population, was less built-up and where navetas were almost the only monuments that stood out in a landscape that combined wooded areas with open areas for growing crops and pasture for livestock closer to the villages, forming a patchwork landscape.     What can I visit at the Closos site? The site is open all year round and entry is free. There is a self-guided itinerary through which you can discover how the prehistoric communities of Mallorca lived over 3,000 years ago. There is also a reconstruction of the prehistoric botanical landscape, which allows you to explore the environment of the past and the relations these societies established with nature. Finally, there is a children’s area with prehistoric and archaeological themes where they can have fun, and comfortable picnic tables where you can rest and eat.   Guided activities for learning about history in Mallorca You can combine your visit to the site with a wide range of activities for everyone. Would you like to go on a guided tour led by the archaeologists who work on the site? Or would you like to learn to shoot with a sling or make a bronze axe like in prehistoric times? You can even become an archaeologist for the day by taking part in the excavations. If you are interested in any of these options, contact us in advance through our social networks (@ProjecteClosos) or at the email address clososgaia@hotmail.com The Closos site is managed by Projecte Closos, an initiative led by Felanitx council and the Universitat de les Illes Balears (UIB), which was launched in 1996 with the aim of making archaeological heritage relevant to 21st century Mallorcan society. With the support of the public, we protect, research and publicise this site to make it a centre for local, sustainable development from the perspective of culture, the environment and people      Combine your historical visit with a pleasant bike ride Take advantage of your visit to the site to enjoy a pleasant bike ride through the beautiful scenery on the way. The Marimonte Mallorca team are waiting for you at inturotel resort with all of the equipment needed for your ride. The site is 8.5 kilometres from our resort. This means that the ride to your destination takes about 45 minutes, following the road from Can Marines to Sa Vileta (the first houses of S’Horta) and then on the Cala Marçal road towards Portocolom. On the way back, we recommend passing through “Els Horts” (the market gardens of S’Horta) with its beautiful views of the clifftop castle of Santueri. You will fall for the land and the people who live there.   Don’t miss out on the experience of visiting an open-air museum of prehistory on your next trip to Mallorca with inturotel!  
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